Reason #1 We Don’t Have A Pool

Alligator in the Pool

SARASOTA CO., FL (WWSB) – The Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office responded to call involving an alligator in a family’s swimming pool.

Deputies say, “Luckily, these homeowners took a second look this morning before jumping in to kick off their Memorial Day.”

The 7-8 foot alligator was at the bottom of the swimming pool at the home in a Plantation neighborhood.

We love the water at the Sleepy Sandpiper — and are just a 10 minute walk to the beach. But this is exactly why we don’t have a pool!

#OnlyInFlorida

Advertisements

Can You Spot the Sea Turtle Nests?

The first loggerhead sea turtle nests of the season were spotted on Anna Maria Island, just north of Casey Key and the Sleepy Sandpiper beach house.

Sea Turtle nests are quite common on Nokomis Public Beach. According to Mote Marine Aquarium and Research Laboratory, here are some do’s and don’ts. . .

Here are some “do and don’t” tips to keep our beaches turtle-friendly:

  • DO stay away from sea turtle nests marked with yellow stakes and tape, and seabird nesting zones that are bounded by ropes.
  • DO remain quiet and observe from a distance if you encounter a nesting sea turtle or hatchlings.
  • DO shield or turn off outdoor lights that are visible on the beach from May through October.
  • DO close drapes after dark and stack beach furniture at the dune line or, ideally, remove it from the beach
  • DO fill in holes that may entrap hatchlings on their way to the water.
  • DON’T approach nesting turtles or hatchlings, make noise, or shine lights at turtles.
  • DON’T use flashlights, head lamps or fishing lamps on the beach.
  • DON’T encourage a turtle to move while nesting or pick up hatchlings that have emerged and are heading for the water.
  • DON’T use fireworks on the beach.
  • DON’T walk dogs on any Sarasota County beach other than Brohard Paw Park in Venice. There, dogs must be leashed or under voice control, according to county ordinances.

 

Anna Maria Island Sea Turtles 2017

Collecting Sea Shells

I love walking up and down the sea shore,  inhaling the fresh sea salt breeze. I hear the gentle rhythm of the waves and watch the sunset.

Sometimes I keep my eyes on the sand, letting them follow the tide line, looking for shells.  This article from Travel for Wildlife will equip you to determine whether the sea treasures you find are alive (give them back to the Gulf!) or dead (bring home as a reminder of peaceful beach days.)

(Some of the photos in the article are from Sanibal Island, just an hour and a half south of the Sleepy Sandpiper!)

 

wp-1484936723633.jpg
Seeking Shells, Nokomis Beach October 2016